8.30.2012

Michio Kaku: Hiding First Contact




Here's a nice --if somewhat controversial-- little video where Michio Kaku details his thoughts on what would likely happen if a major organization discovered intelligent alien life.

As usual, Kaku does a wonderful job of causing the listener to think about situations and repercussions that while simple, are often overlooked. The idea that extraterrestrials are likely to be predators is one I've rarely heard, and idea of encryption in an alien message is one that is all too often forgotten.

Definitively a video worth watching.

So what do you think about Kaku's idea of predatory aliens? Do you think an organization would release the information if they were to discover alien life or would they be forced to remain silent? Is it even possible to force somebody to remain silent in this day of near constant internet access?
 
Rusty is the co-founder of How To Survive Alien Invasion Novels, and gets up to all kinds of shenanigans planning for any and all kinds of apocalypse when he's not busy reading, writing, or yo-yoing. Keep up with him and Rachel on Facebook and Twitter to get cool, space related news or click here to read more of his thoughts on the terror of alien invasion novels.

8.25.2012

August 25, 2012: This Week's Alien and Space News


The world of space and potential aliens has been in the news quite often in the last while. This can mainly be attributed to Curiosity, but investigations into Mars aren't the only things going on. Some of the news is purely scientific, some is practical, and some is sad.

Neil Alden Armstrong: The first man to walk on the moon died today. While we all know the “that’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind” moment, there was a bit more to his life than just Apollo 11. This New York Times article delves into the life of one of the most famous cultural figures of modern science.
Kepler’s Where It’s At: Kepler 22b was one of the first popularized Earth-like planets to be discovered. And ever since that moment, the Kepler area has been popping up on the list of potential colonies with increasing regularity. After this week, it has an astounding 116 planets – that we’ve discovered so far.

Surprisingly, Eating Right and Exercise Is Good For You, Even in Space: Extensive studies sometimes lead to lackluster scientific moments, and this is one of them. To be fair, decreased bone density is a major potential problem facing astronauts, and researchers have been trying to find the best ways to keep people in space healthy. The answer just happens to be exactly what Americans in general suck at recently.

Smooth, Universe, Very Smooth: We live on a fairly dense rock surrounded by gads of really empty space (dark matter notwithstanding). Galaxies follow this pattern, as solar systems are stars, rocks, and calmer gas balls also are surrounded by gads of empty space. Galaxies fit in clusters, which fit into superclusters. However, as the WiggleZ Survey zoomed out on a theoretical map of the Universe, it’s assumed that the universe smoothes out to have an even distribution of matter. And Einstein agrees.

Plants Can Live… But Can They Grow?: NASA is focusing on how plants might fare in space and without gravity, beyond simply staying alive. There are two specific experiments, both of which measure the efficiency – or general success – with which we might use plants for food on long space missions. Of course, the best part is the first quote, where a co-investigator says that plants have to adapt to environments with less gravity… Just like people must.

Want to share all the good (and bad) news? Please be sure to recommend this post on StumbleUpon – all it takes is a click!

Rachel is the co-founder of How To Survive Alien Invasion Novels, and spends her time writing, studying, and reading what would probably be considered far too many books. Connect with her and Rusty on Twitter and Facebook, and click here to read more of her articles about alien theories and how to survive alien invasion novels.

8.23.2012

Michio Kaku: Aliens, Fermi's Paradox, and Dimensions



A great and interesting video of Michio Kaku talking about a wide range of topics. While it's certainly not long, it's wonderfully entertaining and provocative. Definitely worth a watch.

Also, don't forget to comment! What did you think of the video? What do you think of Kaku's views on humans, aliens, and the space? What about the idea of multiple dimensions that are simply beyond our basic understanding?

Rusty is the co-founder of How To Survive Alien Invasion Novels, and gets up to all kinds of shenanigans planning for any and all kinds of apocalypse when he's not busy reading, writing, or yo-yoing. Keep up with him and Rachel on Facebook and Twitter to get cool, space related news or click here to read more of his thoughts on the terror of alien invasion novels.

8.21.2012

You Can Fiddle With the Drake Equation


The Drake Equation is a mathematical equation that tries to answer the question about whether or not there are intelligent alien civilizations out in the galaxy and, if so, how many of those civilizations there might be.

The whole thing reads like this:

N = R^{\ast} \cdot f_p \cdot n_e \cdot f_{\ell} \cdot f_i \cdot f_c \cdot L

and all of those variables are pretty fun to play around with since, like most weird scientific equations, they actually stand for things that make sense. Like the rate of star formation (R*), average number of potentially life-supporting planets per star (n sub e), and how long these improbable civilizations might release detectable signals (L). All of this comes together to give N, a hypothetical number of alien civilizations in the Milky Way.

This is entirely theoretical -- we have yet to find even one alien, let alone an alien civilization -- but the chance is always out there, especially mathematically so.

And, with all the Curiosity-generated interest in aliens at the moment, BBC created a fairly fun infographical calculator that people can play with to generate different answers to the Drake Equation with.

So you don't have to do all that multiplication, I suppose.

But it's great for imagining scenarios (there's even a skeptical analysis of the day up there), and you can plug in optimistic scenarios, pessimistic scenarios, and just fiddle with it. Though, at least at first glance, there doesn't really seem to be too many ways to drop the number of potential alien civilizations in the universe below 15,000. Which is kind of awesome.

All in all, it's a great way to spend time ignoring work.

Please recommend this post on StumbleUpon – all it takes is a click!

Rachel is the co-founder of How To Survive Alien Invasion Novels, and spends her time writing, studying, and reading what would probably be considered far too many books. Connect with her and Rusty on Twitter and Facebook, and click here to read more of her articles about alien theories and how to survive alien invasion novels.

History of Attempted Alien Communication: Happy National Radio Silence Day(s)


The ‘aliens are everywhere we can imagine’ craze of the 19th century did not die out, despite the countless times that belief in anthropomorphic alien civilizations on nearby rocks like the Moon, Mars, and Venus had been completely proven wrong. In fact, as Nikola Tesla and Guglielmo Marconi got involved with the radio, proximal alien mania developed into the idea that aliens are still everywhere we can imagine, we just need to communicate with them differently.
‘Differently’ meaning by radio.


So, 28 years after Tesla first suggested using radio to make contact with aliens, the United States established a one-time-only National Radio Silence Day on August 21-23, 1924, when Mars was closer to Earth than it had been for the past century or would be again for another.

For each of the thirty-six hours within the established time frame, every radio in the country was silent. The US Naval Observatory used these times to fly a dirigible carrying a radio receiver 3 miles into the air. Tuned to a wavelength 8-9 kilometers long, the receiver was expected to pick up transmissions from Mars and Chief Cryptographer of the US Army William F. Friedman was expected to translate them.

Needless to say, William F. Friedman’s services weren’t really needed; not only have we not yet found any signs of life on Mars, any life we might possibly find will probably not have left the microbial stage let alone entered the radio communication stage.

But the country as a whole deserves a bit of credit for being so interested in the possibly of communicating with extraterrestrials that it was willing to let a main source of information and entertainment be interrupted for science.

Good luck getting that to happen today --- the last time that happened, main sources of information and entertainment shut down to stop the potential destruction of these main sources at the hands of the government.

Let’s take a moment of silence here, not to potentially pick up alien communication, but to salute Wikipedia (where I found out about National Radio Silence Day to begin with).

Want to share the news of this completely bypassed moment in American history? Be sure to recommend this post on StumbleUpon -- all it takes is a click!

Rachel is the co-founder of How To Survive Alien Invasion Novels, and spends her time writing, studying, and reading what would probably be considered far too many books. Connect with her and Rusty on Twitter and Facebook, and click here to read more of her articles about alien theories and how to survive alien invasion novels.

8.18.2012

What Are the Odds of a Protagonist Surviving an Alien Invasion Novel?



Not great, but not too bad all things considered.

No matter how morally gray, long, short or ‘dark side of humanity’ any given alien invasion novel is, there’s always going to be some central good guy. This person will always be in the thick of things – whether it’s the survival of a small group or a full-fledged war – so the danger level is both high and constant. But he’s actually fairly safe, because most stories depend on the protagonist to keep going and no one likes to see the hero die unless it’s in some grand sacrificial finale.

The majority of alien invasion novels can fall into loosely organized categories based on the protagonist’s chances of survival. Here’s what a few of those categories are and some warning signs for if you find yourself in a deadly extraterrestrial situation and think you just might be a protagonist.

Alien Invasion Novel Category #1: Everybody Dies

I tend to think that this is the more realistic type of alien invasion novel. If intelligent aliens are capable of developing technology to reach us, they’re definitely capable of completely destroying or dominating us. If The War of the Worlds hadn’t killed off Martians and red weed in the lamest way possible, this is the sort of situation everyone in the book would have faced: the slow deaths of pockets of survivors due to direct annihilation, lack of resources, or death by an aggressive foraging survivor (animal or human). Kind of like Nevil Shute’s On the Beach but less Cold War-esque radiation and more hostile takeover.


Arthur C. Clarke’s Childhood’s End (read my review here) is probably the most famous (and most unique) example of all humans dying. It falls into this category because of two ‘everybody dies’ patterns. One, the story takes place over about one hundred years, and each of the protagonists are adults. The first dies of old age, the second commits suicide with the majority of the human race, and the last human is dissolved with the planet. This is a fairly neat technique, as the story moves along through major character deaths; Orson Scott Card did the same thing in his novel via short stories Capitol, which took place over thousands of years.

Two, like its says in the name of this category, everybody dies. The human children transform into something… other. The remaining humans collectively kill themselves and all other life on earth ends when the once-human children destroy Earth. All humans, not to mention all terrestrial species are killed.

So, how can you tell if you’re in this sort of situation? If increasingly large numbers of people are dying or if you’re confronted with an enemy that both wants to kill everyone and can kill everyone, it’s probably best to enjoy life while you still can. If you’re in charge of the military but haven’t heard of any secret and coincidentally perfect divisions that might save humanity, then you’re probably not in a novel with a happy ending.

Yes, Independence Day is a movie that shouldn’t have had a happy ending, and most people acknowledge that it was crap.

So, if you’re dealing with an overwhelmingly superior alien enemy, huge numbers of people keep dying, and you’re not that special or well-informed, you might not be the protagonist. But chances are everyone’s going to die, so it’s probably not that important.

Alien Invasion Novel Category #2: The Protagonist is Too Important to Die

If you’re interested in survival, then this is the alien invasion novel type for you. But the protagonists in these stories generally have hard lives nonetheless: they usually have to kill or decide who’s going to die, they lose their friends and family, and, due to their being a protagonist in a sort of novel that’s exciting and gritty, are never left in peace for long.

The War of the Worlds, despite what it maybe should have been, falls into this category. The narrator has no marketable survival skills, can be a bit of a bombastic moron at times, and in general isn’t a good candidate for living through an apocalypse in reality. But he was a narrator in a traditionally narrated novel, so he gets to live.

However, it’s not just luck that’ll do it. You have to be specifically suited for the narrator position. To be that, you need to have a unique perspective on the alien invasion, be extremely knowledgable of what’s going on (whether your individual circumstances or the situation more generally), and have some position of power or impact. You also can’t be an entirely repulsive human being, or everyone’s going to be hoping you die.

Some protagonists legitimately deserve their protagonist spots, like Ender in Ender’s Game. He’s too important to die, seeing as how he’s being trained to fight in a pretty large-scale war, and he actually deserves to be important.

As a protagonist, you’re also more likely to survive if you’re an extremely talented leader of a community. As a whole, alien invasion apocalypses and nuclear radiation apocalypses share modern roots in the Cold War, and kind of act the same way. So I’m going to use Pat Frank’s Alas, Babylon to describe this point. The novel centers around a guy who’s effectively sheriff of a small Florida community that managed to evade the nuclear bombs. Things would go the hell for the survivors without his skills, common sense, leadership, and general toughness, so he can’t very well be killed off. He’s just too important to die.

But I can’t very well leave off Bruce Coville and all the kiddie alien invasion novels, either. His most famous alien series, My Teacher is an Alien, focuses on the ‘they’re watching to see if they should destroy us or welcome us into an intergalactic society’ theme. Ultimately, a group of preteens have to find enough ‘good’ in the human race for aliens to let us all live; if anyone kills the protagonist kid, our species would die, so he really is just too important.

Plus, they’re kids’ books – there’s hardly going to be a dark kill-fest.

Unsurprisingly, it’s easy to figure out if you’re a protagonist in this sort of situation. Are aliens invading (or are about to do so)? Are you important and irreplaceable? Is it supremely unlikely for you to be able to make some sort of sacrifice that saves everyone?

Then you’re good. Of course, if you’re the protagonist in practically any alien invasion book, you’re good for at least a little while, because that’s how books work.

But, speaking of sacrifices…

Alien Invasion Novel Category #3: The Protagonist is a Sacrifice

This is the big exception to the general tendency for protagonists to survive, and it doesn’t happen that often.

But every once in a while, some situation comes up where only the primary good guy’s death can save people and our hero, being said primary good guy, accepts this. Like in 30 Days of Night (and I can't believe I'm even using this as an example), when Evan the sheriff turns himself into a vampire, runs off the other vampires terrorizing his town, and then commits suicide via sunrise. This is hopefully more motivated by his desire to not be a homicidal vampire than by his desire to keep his promise of watching the sunrise with his estranged wife, and definitely counts as a hero’s sacrifice.

When you inject yourself with vampire blood, outside of a Twilight novel, your life is over.

As far as I can tell, though, the sacrificial protagonist in alien invasion novels is pretty rare, and not just because alien invasion novels themselves are pretty rare. Sure there’s Rorschach in Watchmen (though Rorschach was only kind of a protagonist, Watchmen is not really an alien invasion [graphic] novel, and he was killed to keep the origins of a Cold War-ending fake extraterrestrial secret more than to ward off an alien attack). There's also the death of protagonist #3 in Childhood’s End. As a whole, there’s not too much a protagonist can do to sacrifice himself in an alien invasion novel that means that much – heroes are at their best when they keep leading, fighiting or narrating as the occasion calls for. Dramatic sidekicks are the ones who sacrifice themselves or distract alien forces at key moments.

Like the crazy guy on Independence Day. Someone in that final battle had to die, and it certainly wasn’t going to be Jeff Goldblum or Will Smith.

In a more serious Armageddon-like movie, there are certain end-game functions a protagonist can serve. If you’re some sort of a protagonist in an alien – or asteroid – situation and the action-packed end-game is at hand, your death might help people survive. Not the death itself, but by you doing something only you can do in a situation you can’t hope to extract yourself from. Because only Bruce Willis can simultaneously nuke a rock and save his daughter's love interest.

However, if there’s a long-term struggle, sacrifices help no one. If the invasion is over and you’re leading a small pocket of resistance or survivors, your function is to stay alive to keep them alive – you’re a protagonist in category #2, not category #3.

Sorry: you’re doomed to survive, and probably doomed to lose severely.

Alien Invasion Novel category #4: The Aliens Are the protagonists


This is a wonky kind of category. In this sort of alien invasion novel, either aliens – like Martians, Keanu Reeves, or Ford Prefect – are the protagonists when they come to Earth, or humans are the invading aliens on another planet. And in this game, anything can happen to the protagonist.

Sometimes, like in Ray Bradbury’s The Martian Chronicles, there isn’t really a protagonist beyond a general stream of humanity. This series of vignettes focuses on the themes of new frontiers, loneliness, and the ghosts of lost civilizations and, after the first few bits and before the last few bits, people aren’t surviving against anything so much as just living, albeit on Mars.

In Sunday Night Yams at Minnie and Earl’s, again, the story focuses on a people’s relation to space and how we deal with scientific progress. There’s no real enemy besides ourselves.

(That is somewhat especially true in the case of The Day the Earth Stood Still, since the alien emphasized the danger we humans are to ourselves.)

This odd focus on aliens as protagonists and humans as aliens rarely centers on violent invasions. Instead they are more existentialist and philosophical. They ask questions about our place in the universe, or the place of someone else (several others) in the universe. And if you’re the protagonist, the odds of you surviving are pretty good.

If only because you’re not fighting for those odds.

So if you’re a protagonist and you know it, the next step is to figure out what kind of novel you’re in. Short of you being in the weird and uncertain fourth category, life is going to be unpleasant whether you live or not. Either everyone’s going to die, you’re going to die to save everyone, or practically everyone but you is going to die.

It’s enough to make you wish you were the alien, sometimes.

If you'd like to leave a comment, suggestion, or query, the box is just below!

Rachel is the co-founder of How To Survive Alien Invasion Novels, and spends her time writing, studying, and reading what would probably be considered far too many books. Connect with her and Rusty on Twitter and Facebook, and click here to read more of her articles about alien theories and how to survive alien invasion novels.

8.11.2012

Neil Tyson: Life the Universe and Everything



Today we have another truly amazing video of everybody's favorite astrophysicist, Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson. In this 90 minute, free-form, question and answer session Tyson discusses everything from Isaac Newton to the potential of alien intelligence, all in his characteristically entertaining way.

This is definitely one of my favorite Tyson videos. The multitude of subjects -- general science, biology, astronomy, history, politics, the future -- discussed and the way that Tyson combines several fields to answer questions in his wonderfully witty way, make this a truly outstanding video. Definitely worth a watch.

Also, don't forget to comment! What did you think of the video? What do you think of Tyson's views on science, technology, and the future? Do you think science is the path to solving humanity's problems?

Rusty is the co-founder of How To Survive Alien Invasion Novels, and gets up to all kinds of shenanigans planning for any and all kinds of apocalypse when he's not busy reading, writing, or yo-yoing. Keep up with him and Rachel on Facebook and Twitter to get cool, space related news or click here to read more of his thoughts on the terror of alien invasion novels.

8.06.2012

Curiosity Rover Takes High Quality Picture of Mars -- 'Our New Home'




Please recommend this picture on StumbleUpon – all it takes is a click!

Rachel is the co-founder of How To Survive Alien Invasion Novels, and spends her time writing, studying, and reading what would probably be considered far too many books. Connect with her and Rusty on Twitter and Facebook, and click here to read more of her articles about alien theories and how to survive alien invasion novels.

Curiosity Has Landed on Mars!



Curiosity has landed!

While this doesn’t directly have to do with any tips, ideas, or drama about surviving alien invasion novels, the Curiosity rover wraps up quite a few themes worthy of note, including future space technology, the space program in the United States, the tenuous relationship between science and politics, and the fairly massively important possible existence of alien life.

After a long journey starting on November 26, 2011, Curiosity landed with several missions in mind. The first, and primary mission, is to investigate Mars for potential signs of life, whether those signs of life include evidence of actual past (or even present!) organisms or just conditions that would allow for life in the future.

After all of the increasingly frequent studies, theories and extrapolations about potential life and life-ready conditions on the surface of Mars, Curiosity is supposed to definitively answer the question ‘has life ever been supported on Mars?’. Aside from this, Curiosity is also supposed to study the overall climate and geology of Mars – after all, the planet might not have had life before, but it’s equally important to see if we could ever live on Mars. (For more information about our plans to ever live on Mars, check out Peter Diamandis and Mars One.)
However, Curiosity is carrying quite a few burdens on its shoulders besides the fairly weighty ones of past and future life on Mars. It also carries the future of NASA’s Mars anything. President Obama, and, really, pretty much every president since the Cold War became less of an issue, has happily chopped away at different facets of the NASA Mars budget. From $587 million to $360 million to $189 million in 2015 (an amount which can do little on the relatively massive scale that even local space travel or colonization is/will be), the entirety of American travel to other planets is at risk. We’ve quit cooperative efforts with Europe, and the first serious plan to colonize Mars is directed form abroad.

But, now that Curiosity has successfully landed and will doubtlessly have some good discovieries to share with us, maybe sheer momentum and – if you saw everyone on the NASA channel and CNN – happy determination will push it back towards more useful numbers.

Curiosity also tested several new mechanisms, not least of which the landing system. Rather than using past methods of just rockets, parachutes, aeroshells, or airbags, Curiosity will be placed on the surface of Mars via Sky Crane.

Yes.

Sky Crane. This new technology was the last step in slowing Curiosity’s descent from its initial speed of 13,200 miles per hour to soft touchdown, and took over in the last twelve seconds. Check out Space.com’s info graphic of it here.


We can look at the science of it, the potential aliens and space colonies of it, and the future of space technology. But at the moment, we should all be deliriously happy that things like this are possible and that things like this are being done.


Please be sure to recommend this post on StumbleUpon – all it takes is a click!

Rachel is the co-founder of How To Survive Alien Invasion Novels, and spends her time writing, studying, and reading what would probably be considered far too many books. Connect with her and Rusty on Twitter and Facebook, and click here to read more of her articles about alien theories and how to survive alien invasion novels.

The 7 Minutes of Terror Have Begun




Before Curiosity lands on Mars, there's supposed to be a short loss of contact. Here's Space.com's idea of how it should go -- with any luck.

Please be sure to recommend this post on StumbleUpon – all it takes is a click!

Rachel is the co-founder of How To Survive Alien Invasion Novels, and spends her time writing, studying, and reading what would probably be considered far too many books. Connect with her and Rusty on Twitter and Facebook, and click here to read more of her articles about alien theories and how to survive alien invasion novels.

Video: The Known Universe




As we approach the landing of the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity, it's important to remember that while this may be a fairly large step for us humans, in the true scale of the universe this massive undertaking amounts to little more than exploring the other side of a grain of sand, something this video from the American Natural History Museum demonstrates remarkably well.

Also, don't forget to thumb us up on StumbleUpon! All it takes is a single click.

Additionally, did anybody else think the border representing our furthest radio waves was awesome?

Rusty is the co-founder of How To Survive Alien Invasion Novels, and gets up to all kinds of shenanigans planning for any and all kinds of apocalypse when he's not busy reading, writing, or yo-yoing. Keep up with him and Rachel on Facebook and Twitter to get cool, space related news or click here to read more of his thoughts on the terror of alien invasion novels.

8.05.2012

August 5, 2012: This Week's Space and Alien News


Today’s the day. Well, I suppose tomorrow’s the day most of us will hear any feedback from Curiosity’s landing, but today is at the very least the day of the landing of our latest Mars rover. As such, the majority of the alien and space news for this week is all about Curiosity, Mars, and the potentials of life and advanced space shuttlery.

With the exception of a study about some radiation that astronauts may or may not face.

NASA Reassures Everyone That Curiosity Isn’t Alone?: As much as has been written about Curiosity in the last few weeks (months), not much more can be said until after it lands and starts sending information – or doesn’t. But in this particular article, NASA describes how not only is Curiosity monitoring for pro-life conditions but will do other stuff (yes, ‘other stuff’), too. It also describes how even Discovery will have a part to play in Curiosity’s landing. And the landing is the most exciting bit we have facing Earth in the next few days, short of Curiosity finding both good conditions for life and maybe even life itself.

Maybe Even Life Itself: Or at least the environment for it. Extrapolations about Mars’s ecology and potential inhabitants have been abound, and here’s a new article to keep them company. Now scientists are looking at polygon formations on the surface that kind of mirror those in Earth oceans. The article throws around the word permafrost which, on top of being not very inviting, does not necessarily denote water. Just think: this might be one of the last guesses about the potential for life on Mars; it might soon be replaced with some sort of certainty.

The Future After Shuttles: The shuttle program might have retired recently, but NASA seems to be indicating that it won’t be the end of space travel full stop. The future of space is in taxis, taxis made by Sierra Nevada Corporation, SpaceX, and Boeing. These three companies have been given funding for the express purpose of shuttling (get it?) people into space. I’m not sure about NASA (or SNC and Boeing), but we can all be assured that SpaceX is probably up for it.


Protons Are Bad for You: So our future taxi passengers don’t grow tumors upon reaching their destination, scientists have been studying the effects of proton radiation on epithelial cells. Protons cause EMT (epithelial-mesenchymal transition), which probably makes cancer worse. Not only is this a good thing to study over all, the fact that people are heavily interested in reducing cancer rates among astronauts means that there might be enough astronauts in the future to make this study viable.

Never Mind to All of the Above, Except the Radiation Risk: The funding crunch is upon us, and this, however fittingly, ironically, or efficiently, seems like a good thing to end this week’s alien and space news on. President Obama – and I like him, I do, but he’s got to stop chopping at the space program – will try to substantially cut NASA’s Mars budget in 2013; not even 2/3 of it will be left. It will then shrink by half in 2015 to $189 million. That’s not a number you can really do anything with in space. So, NASA, author Robert Zubrin, and a substantial portion of the population keeping an eye on space are hoping that Curiosity doesn’t crash. If it does, any Mars program is toast. If it doesn’t, and if it turns up some extraordinary stuff, the Mars program might just be rejuvenated.
  
Want to share all the good (and bad) news? Please be sure to recommend this post on StumbleUpon – all it takes is a click!

Rachel is the co-founder of How To Survive Alien Invasion Novels, and spends her time writing, studying, and reading what would probably be considered far too many books. Connect with her and Rusty on Twitter and Facebook, and click here to read more of her articles about alien theories and how to survive alien invasion novels.

8.04.2012

Stephen Colbert Interviews Neil Tyson





One of the most entertaining interviews I've ever watched. It's absolutely amazing how many different fields Neil Tyson has familiarity with. Add in his wonderful sense of humor, his passion for science and Stephen Colbert's characteristic behavior and you get an absolutely fantastic interview that I honestly wish was longer.

While there isn't a whole lot of discussion about extraterrestrials, there's plenty of talk about space, science, and society's future, so definitely take the time to check this out.

Also don't forget to comment. Do you want to see more posts like this? What did you think of Tyson's view on how children should learn science? Do you think science is the best way to solve the world's problems?


Rusty is the co-founder of How To Survive Alien Invasion Novels, and gets up to all kinds of shenanigans planning for any and all kinds of apocalypse when he's not busy reading, writing, or yo-yoing. Keep up with him and Rachel on Facebook and Twitter to get cool, space related news or click here to read more of his thoughts on the terror of alien invasion novels.